Alcohol & Marijuana Research
Understanding how teens harm themselves if they use alcohol and marijuana should motivate the community to reduce the number of teens who use now and, importantly, to educate, encourage, praise and support teens who choose to live drug-free.

Teens and Alcohol
Young People versus Adults. What’s the Difference? Drinking is more harmful to teens than adults because their brains are still developing and lifelong damage in brain function can result. According to research, young people who begin drinking before age 15 are four times more likely to develop alcohol dependence than those who begin drinking at age 21.

The Effects of Teenage Drinking. Learn the causes, risk factors and dangers associated with teen drinking – and the symptoms and signs of intoxication.

Why Do Adolescents Drink, What Are the Risks, and How Can Underage Drinking Be Prevented? A comprehensive overview of adolescent drinking: risks, harms and prevention strategies -- from the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Addiction.

Marijuana and Teens
Adolescents and Marijuana. An excellent, quick-read overview of the scope of teen marijuana use and how it affects memory, school performance and behaviors, impacts a teen’s performance -- from the University of Washington’s Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute.

How does marijuana use affect school, work, and social life? A summary of studies from the National Institutes of Health about how marijuana impacts many areas of a teen’s life.

Does marijuana use affect driving? The answer is yes and inexperienced teen drivers — many of whom think that “weed makes you driver safer” -- place themselves, their passengers and other drivers at exceptionally high risk. You’ll find the evidence is this NIH Research Report.

Teen 'self-medication' for depression leads to more serious mental illness. Research shows that some teens are using marijuana to alleviate feelings of depression when, in fact, using marijuana can compound the problem.  Learn more about this research as reported in Science Daily®

Want more?  If you want to stay up to date, we recommend Partnership™ for Drug Free Kids – where you can sign up for a free weekly e-newsletter that summarizes the latest news and studies about prevention.